Liquidity

Business / Taxes / Liquidity: If you can convert an asset to cash easily and quickly, with little or no loss of value, the asset has liquidity. For example, you can typically redeem shares in a money market mutual fund at $1 a share. Similarly, you can cash in a certificate of deposit (CD) for at least the amount you put into it, although you may forfeit some or all of the interest you had expected to earn if you liquidate before the end of the CD's term. The term liquidity is sometimes used to describe investments you can buy or sell easily. For example, you could sell several hundred shares of a blue chip stock by simply calling your broker, something that might not be possible if you wanted to sell real estate or collectibles. The difference between liquidating cash-equivalent investments and securities like stock and bonds, however, is that securities constantly fluctuate in value. So while you may be able to sell them readily, you might sell for less than you paid to buy them if you sold when the price was down.

Liquidity Preference Hypothesis

Business / Finance / Liquidity Preference Hypothesis: The argument that greater liquidity is valuable, all else equal. Also, the theory that the forward rate exceeds expected future interest rates. MORE

Liquidity Theory Of The Term Structure

Business / Finance / Liquidity Theory Of The Term Structure: A biased expectations theory that asserts that the implied forward rates will not be a pure estimate of the market's expectations of future interest rates because they embody a liquidity premium. MORE

Liquidity Fund

Business / Finance / Liquidity Fund: A California company that buys real estate limited partnership interests at 25% to 35% lower than the current value of the real estate assets. MORE

Links
Home
Glossary
Thesaurus