Apostrophe

Entertainment / Literature / Apostrophe: Not to be confused with the punctuation mark, apostrophe is the act of addressing some abstraction or personification that is not physically present: For instance, John Donne commands, 'Oh, Death, be not proud.' King Lear proclaims, 'Ingratitude! Thou marble-hearted fiend, / More hideous when thou show'st thee in a child / Than the sea-monster.' Death, of course, is a phenomenon rather than a proud person, and ingratitude is an abstraction that hardly cares about Lear's opinion, but the act of addressing the abstract has its own rhetorical power. An apostrophe is an example of a rhetorical trope.

Genitive

Entertainment / Literature / Genitive: A declension in any synthetic (i.e. Heavily inflected) language that indicates possession. In many Old English singular nouns, an -es declension attached to the end of that noun would indicate the gen MORE

Triple Rhyme

Entertainment / Literature / Triple Rhyme: A trisyllabic rhyme involving three separate syllables to create the rhyme in each word. For instance, grinding cares is a triple rhyme with winding stairs. Fearfully is a triple rhyme with tearfully. MORE

Personification

Entertainment / Literature / Personification: A trope in which abstractions, animals, ideas, and inanimate objects are given human character, traits, abilities, or reactions. Personification is particularly common in poetry, but it appears in nea MORE

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