Consonance

Entertainment / Literature / Consonance: A special type of alliteration in which the repeated pattern of consonants is marked by changes in the intervening vowels--i.e., the final consonants of the stressed syllables match each other but the vowels differ. As M. H. Abrams illustrates in The Norton Anthology of English Literature, examples include linger, longer, and languor or rider, reader, raider, and ruder. Do not confuse consonance with a consonant (see below). See also assonance and sound symbolism.

Rhyme

Entertainment / Literature / Rhyme: Also spelled rime, rhyme is a matching similarity of sounds in two or more words, especially when their accented vowels and all succeeding consonants are identical. For instance, the word-pairs listed MORE

Pararhyme

Entertainment / Literature / Pararhyme: Wilfred Owen's term for a slant rhyme. An example appears in his poem, 'Strange Meeting,' in which Owen rhymes words like years / yours and tigress / progress. MORE

Half-Rhyme

Life Style / Poetry / Half-Rhyme: Rhyming only with the consonants in the terminal syllable(s) of a multi-syllable word. An example is 'concrete' and 'litcrit'. Also termed 'off-rhyme,' 'slant rhyme,' or apophany, in which two single- MORE

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