Chlorine (Cl)

Science / Periodic Table of Elements / Chlorine (Cl): Atomic number: 17, Atomic mass: 35.453 g.mol -1, Electronegativity: 3.0, Density: 3.21*10 -3 g.cm -3 at 20 °C, Melting point: -101 °C, Boiling point: -34.6 °C, Vanderwaals radius: 0.127 nm, Ionic radius: 0.184 (-2) nm ; 0.029 nm (+6), Isotopes: 4, Electronic shell: [Ne] 3s23p5, Energy of first ionisation: 1255.7 kJ.mol -1, Energy of second ionisation: 2298 kJ.mol -1, Energy of third ionisation: 3822 kJ.mol -1, Standard potential: - 1.36 V, Discovered by: Carl Wilhelm Scheele in 1774. Discovered in 1774 by Carl Wilhelm Scheele, who mistakenly thought it contained oxygen. Chlorine was given its name in 1810 by Humphry Davy, who insisted that it was in fact an element. The pure chemical element has the physical form of a diatomic green gas. The name chlorine is derived from chloros, meaning green, referring to the color of the gas. Chlorine gas is two and one half times as heavy as air, has an intensely disagreeable suffocating odor, and is exceedingly poisonous. In its liquid and solid form it is a powerful oxidizing, bleaching, and disinfecting agent. This element is a part of the halogen series forming salts. It is extracted from chlorides through oxidation and electrolysis. Chlorine gas is greenish-yellow and combines readily with nearly all other elements. Applications: Chlorine is an important chemical in water purification, in disinfectants, in bleach and in mustard gas. Chlorine is also used widely in the manufacture of many products and items directly or indirectly, i.e. in paper product production, antiseptic, dyestuffs, food, insecticides, paints, petroleum products, plastics, medicines, textiles, solvents, and many other consumer products. It is used to kill bacteria and other microbes from drinking water supplies. Chlorine is involved in beaching wood pulp for paper making, bleach is also used industrially to remove ink from recycle paper. Chlorine often imparts many desired properties in an organic compound when it is substituted for hydrogen (synthetic rubber), so it is widely use in organic chemistry, in the production of chlorates, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, and in the bromine extraction. Chlorine in the environment: In nature it is only found combined with other elements chiefly sodium in the form of common salt (NaCl), but also in carnallite, and sylvite. Chlorides make up much of the salt dissolved in the earth's oceans: about 1.9 % of the mass of seawater is chloride ions. The amount of chloride in soils varies according to the distance from the sea. The average in top soils is about 10 ppm. Plants contain various amount of chlorine; it is an essential microutrient for higher plants where is concentrates in the chloroplasts. Growth suffers if the amount of chloride in the soil fall below 2 ppm, but it rarely happens. The upper limit of tolerance varies according to the crop.

Chlorine (Cl)

Science / Periodic Table of Elements / Chlorine (Cl): Atomic number: 17, Atomic mass: 35.453 g.mol -1, Electronegativity: 3.0, Density: 3.21*10 -3 g.cm -3 at 20 °C, Melting point: -101 °C, Boiling point: -34.6 °C, Vanderwaals radius: 0.127 nm, Ionic r MORE

Chlorinity (CL)

Science / Tides and Currents / Chlorinity (CL): The total amount in grams of chlorine, bromine, and iodine contained none kilogram of seawater, assuming the bromine and iodine to be replaced by chlorine. The number giving the chlorinity in grams pe MORE

Halogen

Science / Chemistry / Halogen: An element of group VIIA (a. K. A. Group 18). The name means 'salt former'; halogens react with metals to form binary ionic compounds. Fluorine (F), chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br), iodine (I), and astati MORE

Links
Home
Glossary
Thesaurus