Interlaced Scanning

Technology / Television (TV) / Interlaced Scanning: In a television display, interlaced scanning refers to the process of re-assembling a picture from a series of electrical (video) signals. The 'standard' NTSC system uses 525 scanning lines to create a picture (frame). The frame/picture is made up of two fields: The first field has 262.5 odd lines (1,3,5...) And the second field has 262.5 even lines (2,4,6...). The odd lines are scanned (or painted on the screen) in 1/60th of a second and the even lines follow in the next 1/60th of a second. This presents an entire frame/picture of 525 lines in 1/30th of a second.

Interlaced Video

Technology / Television (TV) / Interlaced Video: TV frames consist of two fields of alternating lines that are scanned onto the picture display unit (e.g., picture tube) in rapid sequence to produce an interlaced video image. MORE

Noninterlaced Video

Technology / Television (TV) / Noninterlaced Video: Each line is scanned during each total vertical (full) screen refresh. Computer monitors use typically noninterlaced video. MORE

Scanning Electron Microscope

Entertainment / Photography / Scanning Electron Microscope: Device used in photomicrography. MORE

Links
Home
Glossary
Thesaurus